Nov 4, 2012

Dinner with Alice Waters

I received and invitation by my darling friend and dining guru Katie Parla a few weeks ago that I could not turn down, simply because it involved good food and the promise of an intimate conversation with Alice Waters.
The founder and mastermind behind the Berkeley cradle of food revolution Chez Panisse Restaurant, activist of the locavore movement that has been shifting food education and eating habits across the nation, and ultimately the Rome Sustainable Food Project, was coming to Rome for a benefit hosted by the very American Academy Rome kitchen miracle she performed 6 years ago, and I was going to be a part of it.

The American Academy Rome and Alice Waters appointed executive chef Mona Talbott, sous chef Chris Boswell, and a varied team of cooks and interns, to provide tasty and healthy meals for the Academy's fellows and scholars using fresh, organic, regional and seasonal produce and herbs grown for the kitchen on the Academy property. Before this, the Academy's food was historically a nightmare. After 5 years since the birth of RSFP, Mona decided to return to New York, leaving Chris Boswell in charge of the well-oiled kitchen. One of the reasons I support the RSFP by signing up as a Friend of the Academy (an annual donation of €75) was so that I could attend the many events hosted here, but mostly to enjoy the labor of love of Mona, Chris, Mirella and the rest of the kitchen staff on those weekdays when Friends (and friends of Friends, up to 10!) can come eat a buffet lunch composed of garden produce cooked with love for only a handful of Euros.

Back to the dinner. So here I am, climbing the Janiculum Hill under a full moon, and entering the candle-lined path of Villa Aurelia, a sage-smelling trail that will ultimately lead me to being in the same room with one of the women that mostly influenced my way of foraging, cooking and providing healthy meals for my child. My heart is fluttering, and it's not because of the uphill workout. Well, that too.

Cocktails are served in a beautiful frescoed room of the second floor, lit by ginormous chandeliers, soft notes waft from a grand piano and I immediately spot Ms Waters chatting with another guest. While I sip on a very good drink made with whiskey, ginger ale and rosemary, I glance over to the table that's been set for us in the main dining room.

Ok, not as intimate as we had expected, but still, breathtaking. Candles flicker and fruits from the AAR garden adorn the table, place cards are hand drawn, picturing seasonal veggies. Almost too perfect.

The bread baskets overflow with Roscioli buns, wines are poured generously and the meal is nourishing, prepared by no other than Mona Talbott, who has come back to the AAR just for this occasion, what a lovely surprise to see her there! Pictured below is the evening's menu.

The seating arrangement is decided on a draw, I happen 2 seats from the guest of honor and next to me is a lovely young lady named Luisa, who works as photo editor for the NY Times and is now living in Rome with her husband, a graphic design fellow at the Academy and their 4 year-old son. To my other side sits Vikki of In Rome Now, a helpful online resource I often use. Small world.
Between courses, Alice Waters addresses the guests and speaks enthusiastically of Italy and its food education, habits and values. Her soft-spoken, slight Southern drawl clashes with the iron principles she so stubbornly stands for, but I guess that makes sense. She has only words of praise for Italy, the Slow Food movement founded by Carlo Petrini, and all the wonderful options we are given here.
Except, I'd like to say something, but I don't dare. I'd like to whisper that it's not really a bed of roses, that way too many supermarkets and bad eating habits are common here too, not only overseas. I'd like to say that the image of this dolce vita lifestyle, with nonna's recycling of leftovers and solid morality in the grocery shopping list is sadly not happening. The average family does not have all that much choice. Sadly there is no chance to forage wisely, no trace of the community gardens Alemanno promised Waters during her last visit 2 years ago... nor of the edible schoolyards purportedly commissioned in every public school of the city. Niente. I'd like to say it out loud that it's still brutally expensive to shop at the farmers markets and Italian CSA equivalents because mass distribution is killing us... I should say something (bites nails)...
But I don't. I remain silent because I'm hopeful. Maybe the revolution brought in the kitchen of the American Academy will spread like a sweet virus, and all discount supermarkets, antibiotic-spiked animals, dioxin-rich mozzarella and Monsanto will magically disappear in a cloud of vapor. I see Katie squirming in her seat, I'm sure she feels the same conflict. I take another sip of Sagrantino di Montefalco and let Alice Waters finish her speech without interruptions.

Vervain tea and biscotti are served in the inner sanctum: the library of Villa Aurelia. I loved the Nuciata c'addauru, a Sicilian candy bar that's like a walnut brittle made with honey and spices, but pressed between two bay leaves, which are eaten whole. I'm trying to capture the awesome lingering flavor combo (while dislodging laurel bits from my teeth) when a gentle and prosperous Cecilia Tessieri takes the floor. In a charming broken English she poetically tells us about Amedei and her family's artisan craft in Pontedera... and the chocolate tasting trays are passed around. Yes, and Im in heaven.

Outside the library window is a terrace, and beyond that terrace, Rome blinks her million lights, proffering her black velvet décolletage. Spectacular, I feel so thankful to be here.
With far too many assorted alcoholic drinks in me and blood sugar three times over the decency level, I skip down the sage path and say my farewells.
I'm half way home when I realize I didn't say goodbye to Alice Waters.

All grainy iPhone photos taken by me, save for the opening portrait, courtesy of Chez Panisse

21 comments:

  1. wow...this sounds like an absolutely delightful evening....

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  2. Hi Eleonora... I hope that ideals about italian food coming from you, Alice, etc will become reals!

    P.S. A long time ago a sicilian friend of mine told me of the Nuciata c'addauro: her recipe provided, however, a single laurel leaf that was not to be eaten but used as a lollipop ;-)

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    1. Ah, ecco! Sono stata tutta la sera a levarmi pezzi di foglie coriacee dai denti...
      Grazie del tuo commento e scusa se risp solo ora (la mia via è un caos)

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  3. Ah, a great meal, a nourishing dream for all, an earnest commitment to continue to improve all of our chances to live a good life, wherever we are.
    Ciao, Eleonora.
    You write like a poet.

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    1. Rosaria,
      my life is such a mess, I'm managing to reply to your delightful comment today. Scandalous.
      Food educations is very important to me, so one of my resolutions this year will be to provide as much of it as I possibly can, even on these pages.
      Ciao amica mia, I am humbled by your words.

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  4. I always love hearing your perspective, Eleonora. Wise message for things are always rarely as they seem on the other side of the fence. When I was visiting Georgia, as in the US state recently I was impressed by how the reality of sustainable eating and farming had taken hold in some very small, rural communities... granted it's not Rome, but as all travel does to places where one is only familiar with the stereotypes, if opened my eyes.

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    1. That's the whole point: small, rural communities should be our inspiration in larger metropolitan areas, but it's so difficult at this point. Thanks for your comment. I sincerely hope food education gets the attention it deserves, and it's our duty as bloggers, parents, foodies and lifestyle reporters to "make noise."

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  5. Sounds like a great experience! Loved reading this.

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  6. A wonderful post! Thank you for sharing such an amazing evening with the rest of us.

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    1. Thank you, I'm happy this resonated with you :)

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  7. What a wonderful post. Thank you for sharing such an amazing evening with us.

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  8. A wonderful post! Thank you for sharing such an amazing evening with the rest of us.

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  9. She's ALIIIIIVVE!

    Thanks for the shout out. I hope things are going well for you. Sorry about the 'anonymous' but I don't know which category to use.

    Ciao.

    Jeff

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    Replies
    1. It feels good to receive such a warm "welcome back"
      Hugs and happy new year

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  10. Lucky you! It must have been a fascinating (and delicious) experience.

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    1. An interesting experience, eye-opening...
      Buon Anno!

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  11. What a night. It was nice getting swept up in your memory. Imagining what it would have been like to be there as well.

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    1. Thanks Tracy! That's exactly what I wished with this post: include you in that tableside conversation.

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  12. Ciao Eleanora. It has been half a year since I've blogged or read other blog postings and was fascinated by your stream of consciousness while noshing with Alice. But then reminded that if we accent the positive and downplay the negative, we can create miracles.

    I was wondering about the slow food movement in reality in the big cities of Italy. Distribution systems are hard to break into for smaller producers...same here in Montana. But I am going down fighting for local food and vote with my dollars. Welcome back and so looking forward to your recipes again.

    Hugs ~

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    1. Deborah, thank you so much for this. I'm overwhelmed with the affection after almost 6 months of blog-silence I thought readers would have been fed up with me.
      I totally agree with focusing on the positive, but sometimes it gets hard, mass distribution is changing our traditions, rituals, typicalities! People are forgetting what it was like eating 20 years ago...
      We have to be strong and revolutionary, it's our responsibility, our obligation towards our children, society, the future.
      Hopefully the new year will come with a more health and environment-attentive consciousness worldwide.

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