Jun 3, 2010

Costata alla Pizzaiola


As you may have noticed, Aglio, Olio & Peperoncino has undergone a few changes. Thank you for being patient while I sorted through links, updated my recipe index, promoted new features, various services and introduced a series of fresh new activities.

Do you wish to keep up to date with Aglio, Olio & Peperoncino's brand new topics, articles, posts and tasty meals? Just sign up for our mailing list in the sidebar under the pesto header! You'll receive a weekly newsletter with our latest activity, plus offers, give-aways, cooking tips, wine notes and upcoming food events.

 ::

But enough talk, let's get right to business. Today we're making Costata alla Pizzaiola, a hearty Nepolitan beef rendition that involves the use of oregano enriched pizza-style tomato sauce (hence the name) oozed over a sizzling rib eye steak. Fussy vegetarian-prone children and voracious lovers equally adore.




Ingredients for 4 guests:
4 entrecĂ´tes
(steaks cut from between the 9th and 11th rib), or rib eye beefsteak
2 cups canned cherry or Roma tomatoes
3 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt & pepper to taste
Oregano (here you can go crazy)
1 teaspoon organic brown sugar

::

In a wide saucepan, sauté the garlic in 3 tablespoons of olive oil. When it begins to tan, add the tomatoes, a dash of salt, fat pinch of oregano and the sugar. Cook uncovered over medium heat until sauce is no longer watery, about 10-15 minutes.
Heat a griddle to fiery hot and sprinkle with coarse sea salt.
Trim only a little fat off the steak steak, nick the nerves and broil the meat for a few minutes to rare.

Pour the Pizzaiola sauce over the steak on the griddle and crank up the heat for another minute or two. Spattering will ensue, so be careful.

Transfer to a warm plate and devour. Keep bread handy for mandatory scarpetta*

 Image © Non Solo Primi



* The custom in which a small piece of hand-held breadcrumb mops up any delicious food residue in plate and is devoured.

15 comments:

  1. yeah, i would not want to miss a drop...

    ReplyDelete
  2. oooh this sounds delicious! i grilled a ribeye the other night but it was so boring compared to this -- thanks for the yummy idea eleonora!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I am ravenous, just reading the recipe! I just want someone else to prepare it!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Lola, I like, very nice, Thank you:)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh Lola, you have taught us well about the scarpetta. What better way to enjoy it than this.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Brian~ "Scarpetta" is frowned upon by table etiquette fundamentalists. But I don't care.
    Amanda~ My pleasure!
    RNSANE~ Ha ha sometimes, I feel like that too...
    CChuck~ Glad you enjoy!
    LoriE~ Very little else beats this for scarpetta. Ciao!

    ReplyDelete
  7. THIS is what I'm talking about! Happy memories of mom and grandma!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Lola, do they make the picture of the cow and the names of the cuts of meat in Italian? I am often confused about what to ask the butcher for when following a recipe written in English.

    ReplyDelete
  9. hello there sweetie, i'm thinking of you so much.
    Chuck has an article out in an mag from Italy called Surf News, his writing looks funny(cool) in italian, i never knew there was surfing in Italy.
    We will be right over for this meal and a paddle out!
    xxx lori

    ReplyDelete
  10. This site is look wonderful Lola.

    Well done!

    all the best for a prosperous time ahead.

    xx robyn

    ReplyDelete
  11. Scarpetta, now that's sounds like my favorite way of eating, especially yummy entrecotes with tomato sauce

    ReplyDelete
  12. First time commenting, although I have been reading your blog for months.
    Great post!
    I always chuckle when people mention "scarpetta" (or its equivalent in any other language); I remember my first American husband's horror when my whole family went after the roasted chicken drippings with some bread. When we convinced him to try it himself, he never looked back!
    Ciao, Lana

    ReplyDelete
  13. Joe~ Yeah, baby c'mon: W la mamma e la nonna!!
    Saretta~ terminology traps scattered everywhere. When I was researching names in English for the book, I had a really hard time! Emailed yu some Italian charts.
    LoriA~ Wow! That's great news, give Chuck my congratulations!!
    Emom~ Big smiles!
    Robyn~ Thank you! I'm sorry I've been silent on other friends' blogs, but I have my hands full at the moment! :)
    Sarah~ It is indeed the final touch. And a cook-pleaser! I love it when my guests sop up. Good sign.
    Bibberche~ Thank you Lana, the quiet guest! Here have some wine to go with that scarpetta–from which there is hardly ever going back.

    ReplyDelete
  14. A sweet hello from Frog Hollow Farm! What a fantastic looking meal - I am the beef eater in the family but I could see my Sicilian hubby sitting at the table with a chunk of fresh semolina bread in his hand, scooping up this sauce along with the drippings from the steak. As always, thank you for sharing something simple but delicious and beautiful to look at! Ciao, bella!

    ReplyDelete

Grazie for visiting and taking the time to comment!

Please do not include URLs in your comment as they will get lost in the anti-spam queue, which I do not check for valid comments.

If your comment never appears, kindly send me a message on my Contact page, thanks!

Ciao
Eleonora

Share!